McElroy Tutor Blogs

Free Explanations to the First 40 Questions from the GRE PowerPrep 2 Software


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-28

I am happy to announce that we have released a free PDF of the explanations to the first 40 multiple-choice questions (Sections 3 and 4 : Verbal and Quant) of Test #1 of the the GRE PowerPrep 2 Software. Keep Reading

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GRE Vocabulary: Opaque


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-24

opaque (adjective) : something that is cloudy, blurry, or difficult to understand. "oh PAKE" Think : an opaque lake. If you don't want to get sick this summer, then I don't recommend swimming in an opaque lake. Keep Reading

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Who (subject) vs. Whom (object) vs. Who (modifier): Who called whom?


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-13

Brian tackles the who vs. whom issue. Keep Reading

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How to Identify the Assumptions in an Argument / The Elements of an Argument


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-13

How to Identify the Assumptions in an Argument / The Elements of an Argument Keep Reading

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"Whether" vs. "Whether or Not": Can I always remove the "or not"?


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-13

"Whether" vs. 'Whether or Not' : Can I always remove the "or not"? Keep Reading

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"If" vs. "Whether": Do you know (if/whether) you understand the difference?


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-12

These days, the word "if" is often incorrectly substituted for of the word "whether". Here's the rule : The word "if" should be used in preparation for 1 scenario only. For example : Keep Reading

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"I am well" vs. "I am good": The Correct Answer May Surprise You.


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-12

Don't worry; if you're one of the many people who says "I am well" and/or "I feel differently" (both incorrect) during normal conversation, then I won't feel good (yes, James Brown had it right all along!) about correcting you. ; ) Keep Reading

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GRE Vocabulary: Inveigle


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-06

inveigle (verb) "in-VAY-gull" : to entice, lure (a person), aquire or win (a thing) through deception or flattery. Think : inveigle a bagel. I was able to inveigle a bagel by impressing the bagel store owner with my fluent Polish. Keep Reading

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GRE Vocabulary: Calumnious


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-06

Calumnious (adjective) : "kuh-LUM-nee-us" slanderous, defamatory, an untrue statement intended to injure one's reputation. Think : gossip column. The author of the famous gossip column was less concerned with provoking lawsuits through his calumnious statements than he was with attracting hordes of readers through salacious headlines. Keep Reading

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Which Colleges Require Both SAT and ACT scores?


Posted by Brian R. McElroy on 2016-07-06

A lot of my students take both the SAT and the ACT, and are wondering what schools require both tests, all tests of one type, or some variation thereof. Here is a current list. Keep Reading

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